1. Pared-back and peaceful

When you think of summer style, whether it’s fashion, food or interiors, it’s all about freshness, and that doesn’t have to mean using the lightest shades. In this Georgian townhouse, the walls have been stippled – it's a paint technique where you create the appearance of a textured, dappled wall using a combination of shading and dotted paintwork. The marble-like effect is achieved by first applying a base coat in mid-grey and then stabbing the wall with different tonal paints (lighter greys, whites and blues) in vertical sections using a sponge or stiff brush, before adding a top coat of antiqued gold paint. The reason it works so well in summer is because it’s got a light-reflective sheen so makes your room appear brighter, but come autumn, the textured effect and mix of tones will become cosy.

Paint aside, the real secret behind this contemporary summer bedroom is that it’s been pulled back to such an extent that your eye focuses on just one or two key elements. The main ones here? Linen and light. Bare timber floors and occasional table aside, the main things you notice are the light flooding from the sash windows and bouncing off the Egyptian cotton linen and glass and brass tables, and then the abundance of linen fabric – one of summer’s favourite yarns. The upholstered headboard, the little slipper chair, the scatter cushions, the end-of-the-bed blanket (which is actually one of our Emily tablecloths) are all in natural linen coloured in pinks and greys.

This is a more contemporary, artistic way of achieving a summery scheme in your bedroom – one that feels full of air and space.  

 

2. Bright and white

A white-centric palette has to be one of the most classic summer looks – again, in both fashion and interiors. Even though we all know that colours work all year through, we’re almost pre-conditioned to think: white and light in summer, dark and brooding in winter. But to stop your white scheme from feeling too one-dimensional, be sure to bring in lots of contrasting textures as your first point of difference, and then at least one tonal difference too.

Look closer at our white bedroom and you’ll straight away see how the walls have more than paintwork going on. There are original beams running vertically across every wall, which we’ve painted white, so they stand out without shouting for attention. You could add panelling from skirting to ceiling (or just halfway up your wall), or add shiplap boarding to your ceiling if your home doesn’t have any old character like this. Then you’ll probably look to the pillow-y bed, with its generous duvet that’s been plumped up to look like a fluffy white cloud; the choice of plain white bed linen helps, but it’s the choice of a feather duvet and the way the bed’s been made that counts too. The all-white bedside lamp is a smaller feature not to be forgotten either. Together, they’re ways to show white in a whole host of intriguing guises.

It’s not all about crisp white though. The little bedside table is in pale and pretty Sage green paint. The knitted throw is in a muted shade of grey. The headboard panel is in a stone-coloured linen. Little differences like these help the white to stand out more rather than distract from it – as does that starkly different walnut flooring. But when you do home in on those lighter tones in the room, they’re equally as fresh and summery as the white landscape that dominates.

 

3. Nature at heart

This last summer bedroom is one that’ll work best in cottages, barn conversions and period properties where there’s lots of character, but you can absolutely take ideas from it for a more modern home. It’s also the most transeasonal of the three looks, because the interior design is hinged on nature as its theme rather than the season – and nature is relevant all 365 days.

Let’s start by looking at what’s happening underfoot. Sisal carpeting on the stairs leads down to oak floorboards that peep out from overlapping rugs. That’s a huge amount of natural texture to feel beneath your feet. It makes you want to pad around the house barefoot rather than in socks, slippers or shoes to take it all in, and being barefoot is so inherently summery.

Now take in the palette. Similar to our second bedroom interior, there’s a lot of white and there are touches of grey, but deep verdant, velvety greens, delicate sage in floral printed linens, and bark-like browns are what catch the eye first – a tonal coupling that links your mind straight back to trees, plant life and the great outdoors. But, balanced with the lighter tones, the whole feeling of this bedroom is of a bright and beautiful summer’s day. Summery as it is though, you can just picture how that woollen throw at the end of the bed, those plump velvet cushions, and the velvet-cloaked armchair, will feel curling up with when the mercury isn’t so high come October and beyond…