Interiors: The Greatest Rooms of the Century, Phaidon

Chosen by Jessica Doyle, design and interiors editor at The Telegraph

“This hefty book has only just come out, but it has swiftly gone to the top of my list. It’s intended as a visual sourcebook of beautiful interiors, and features 400 different rooms from across the world designed over the past 100 years, displaying a huge range of styles. On one page, you’ll find Coco Chanel’s classical living room in Paris; on another, Nancy Lancaster’s iconic Yellow Drawing Room, or Ralph Lauren’s clubby library. It’s impossible to pick a favourite. I can see myself dipping into this book for years to come and finding fresh inspiration every time. Plus, it comes in a smart velvet jacket (in a choice of four colours), so it looks very chic on my shelf.”

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The Essential House Book, Sir Terence Conran, Conran Octopus Ltd

Chosen by Suzanne Imre, former editor of Livingetc and creative consultant

“When I moved into my first ‘grown up’ home, I quickly realised that, while my job as editor of Livingetc magazine meant I was up to speed on trends and products, I needed help when it came to planning a space. So, I turned to the father of relaxed, modern living, Sir Terence Conran, and his book, The Essential House Book. Over the next few months (and during consecutive house moves), the book became my bible – encouraging me to consider room proportions, window shapes, storage options and more; challenging me to reject the conventional in favour of personal flair, and giving me a helpful (and to this day, still relevant) contacts book. Thank you, Sir T.”

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Choosing Colours, Kevin McCloud, Quadrille

Chosen by Deborah Barker, former editor of Homes & Gardens

“Whenever I start thinking about decorating somewhere in our home (and I’m nearly always thinking about it…) there are two books I turn to: Choosing Colours by Kevin McCloud and Blue and White and Other Stories: a personal journey through colour by William Yeoward. Our home has grown organically and, invariably, I’m not trying to replicate a look but create a feeling. With that in mind, I always start by choosing the colours. Kevin’s book has over 60 different colour palettes. Some I’d never use, but that doesn’t matter because all of them spark ideas and the ones I love I keep coming back to. Meanwhile, if I’m looking for examples of how to layer colour and pattern to beautiful effect, I turn to William’s book, which is full of vision and inspiration.”

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Haute Bohemians, Vendome Press

Chosen by Hatta Byng, editor of House & Garden

“I’ve turned to this wonderful – and heavy – book by photographer Miguel Flores Vianna time and time again since it was published in 2017. Miguel’s full-bleed pictures and brief but evocative text reveal the private worlds of the most intriguing and stylish bohemians across four continents. There are no captions and little text to guide you but, for me, flicking through these pages is a joyous lesson in the importance of ‘things’ and the art of layering to create inviting and memorable rooms. There’s also plenty of decoration inspiration, be it Nathalie Farman-Farma’s pattern on pattern in her London flat, the juxtaposition of unlikely colours in Min Hogg’s house in Gran Canaria or the pretty gathered skirt on a long daybed in Carolina Irving’s Paris flat.”

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Design Thread, Kit Kemp, Hardie Grant

Chosen by Giles Kime, interiors editor at Country Life

“Kit Kemp’s books have never failed to delight me – she’s the driving force behind the interiors of some of London’s most thrilling hotels. And the latest, Design Thread, offers an intriguing insight into the creative process behind the extraordinary spaces she creates. What I take from the book isn’t a desire to replicate the looks, but plenty of encouragement to break the rules.”

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Mad About the House: How to Decorate Your Home with Style, Kate Watson-Smyth, Pavilion Books

Chosen by the Neptune design team

“The charming illustrations, the companion tone that makes you feel as though Kate’s talking to you as a friend rather than a reader, and the balance between intelligent design authority and real-life, down-to-earth examples make this a book from which you can learn great things but also enjoy reading page after page. If you’ve listened to her podcast, which we very much suggest you do (The Great Indoors with interior designer Sophie Robinson, now into its third fantastic series), you can really appreciate how every word is authentically Kate. She has the ability to make interior design accessible and expert at the same time. This one’s a book that will leave you feeling empowered to take on your own schemes with confidence, clarity and a fair few chuckles along the way.”

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